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kk

holy moly what an eye opener to see so many of these people died of gunshot wounds

EC

Both of these sites are amazing work, and they show images that are only memories for many people. Given that we used to live in Clifton, we were especially amused by the Ludlow Ave. link. We think that the mail carrier must have loved your work.

RESPONSE: Thanks a lot, glad you enjoyed it. My Dad warned the mail carriers in advance.

zigzag

For years when I lived in New Orleans, I collected the wonderfully colorful nicknames (and names) of people in the Times Picayune's obituaries section. Dump-Turtle, Money, Sqweenchy, Toma-Tomane, UK-Colunda, Jesus Hots, Sheepy, Doidy, Infinite, Meticulous, Globe Trotter, etc. etc. are among those I remember. I was thrilled to see your blog and realize I'm not the only one with an appreciation for the singular way the people in Louisiana celebrate life and one another.

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I remember. I was thrilled to see your blog and realize I'm not the only one with an appreciation for the singular way the people in Louisiana celebrate life and one another.

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Mardi Gras 2006

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    Hello Everybody, Here's a few pics of our 2006 Mardi Gras. The first few photos are of the Krewe of Barkus, the dog parade. Those of you who know Titus will recognize him in a cameo butt-sniffing appearance. The next grouping of photos are all related to the pursuit of beads at a beloved parade known as Thoth(harden the T and rhyme it with oath). This is one of my favorites and although the parade route had to change this year it made for a great time. And the last several photos are all of costumed denizens of the Marigny/Bywater/French Quarter in a walking parade put on by the Krewe of St Anne. Typically, a few hundred costumed and inebriated individuals gather at the Friendly Bar in the Marigny at about 9AM on Fat Tuesday and then proceed to dance and meander their way into the Quarter with the escort of a few brass bands. They march for several hours and end up at the Mississippi River where the ashes of former members are scattered into the waters. This tradition was started in the 80s by a group of gay men creatively responding to the AIDS epidemic, and over time it's evolved into an event that anyone can join in on......so long as you're costumed. This years Mardi Gras festivities were a great release for most of us. It's cliche to say at this point, but for a few days the city seemed like its normal dense self rather than the vacant shell that we're slowly becoming accustomed to. The creativity of the costumes was wonderful this year with many Katrina related themes - dresses made of blue tarps, requests for more dikes, cake wielding Barbara Bushes, blind levee inspectors, Shaw group pirates, etc etc. But the great thing about Mardi Gras is that you don't have to be clever or thematic, you just have to be colorful, and I think the photos in here capture a little of that. Enjoy! JML